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The Great Hunt (Wheel of Time, #2)

The Great Hunt (Wheel of Time, #2) - Robert Jordan The second book in the series, some people complain there are some influences of [a:J.R.R. Tolkien|656983|J.R.R. Tolkien|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/authors/1329870573p2/656983.jpg] in the first book; this book is where [a:Robert Jordan|6252|Robert Jordan|https://d202m5krfqbpi5.cloudfront.net/authors/1175475715p2/6252.jpg] found his own voice.

For the first time in centuries The Great Hunt is called; its purpose is to find the legendary Horn of Valere which calls the greatest heroes of all times to the battle yet again. Countless number of people wander around looking for it. Rand and company know exactly where the Horn is, but they might have trouble reaching it. It does not help any that there is a prophesy - coming from the bad guys, no less - which talks about the Daughter of the Night (think female Darth Vader) being set loose upon the world again.

What really stood out during my reread is the development of Rand as the character; Mat and Perrin take backseat to this, but Rand is fascinating. The majority of the book is spent on his POV and his struggle to remain independent and to reject the leadership role thrust upon him; unfortunately he has little or no choice in the matter.

I also realized I like Nynaeve and have great respect for her. Yes, I said this. She was the most annoying character during my first read, but now I know how she will develop. Without giving any spoilers, she will be the only Aes Sedai who never tries to manipulate anybody - she bullies some of the people instead.

Egwene gets some much-needed lessons in humility which unfortunately will be lost upon her in the future books. This is the last book where Elayne and Gawin behave like normal human beings, and not people with some (sometimes severe) mental deficiency. These two as well as their mother and half-brother are among the worst good guys in fantasy.

In the conclusion this book is worth 5 very solid stars. The first 5 or 6 books are a must read for any fantasy fans; even if you do not like it you have to see what all the fuss about the series is about. I also noticed something during my first reading as well as reread: the length of the books seems daunting in the beginning, but by the middle of each book it is really hard to put them down as they really pull you in their world. You owe it to yourself to check the series.